Climate

The climate crisis and the food crisis are intimately linked, with the industrial food system - from farm to supermarket - largely responsible for both. Under this programme area, GRAIN draws attention to the responsibility of industrial agriculture and centralised supply chains in causing the climate crisis, and how food sovereignty and peasant-led agroecology offer a tremendous potential to solve a good part of it. 

We do so through sustained information and outreach activities, and through active strategy development and coalition building with the social movements involved.

Two ways to tackle livestock’s contribution to the climate crisis

We cannot address climate change without reducing the production and consumption of industrial meat and dairy. Learn more in this fact sheet drawn up by GRAIN and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy.

We cannot address climate change without reducing the production and consumption of industrial meat and dairy. Learn more in this fact sheet drawn up by GRAIN and the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy.

The global dangers of industrial meat

Through lobbying, marketing, and proselytizing about cheap meat, the global meat industry is working hard to keep industrially produced meat on the menu, sometimes with disastrous consequences.  

Through lobbying, marketing, and proselytizing about cheap meat, the global meat industry is working hard to keep industrially produced meat on the menu, sometimes with disastrous consequences.  

Grabbing the bull by the horns: it’s time to cut industrial meat and dairy to save the climate

When we think of the big drivers of climate change, cars and air travel often come to mind. But transformations over the past century in the way food is produced and consumed have resulted in more greenhouse gas emissions than those from transportation. The biggest culprits? Industrial meat and dairy. The most widely cited official estimate holds that the food system is responsible for up to 30 per cent of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Some of these emissions are due to the growth of packaged and frozen foods, the increased distance foods are shipped and the rise in food waste. But the most important source of food system-related GHG emissions is the escalation of meat and dairy consumption—made possible by the expansion of industrial livestock and chemical-intensive feed crops. The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) says meat production alone now generates more GHG emissions than all the world’s transport combined.

When we think of the big drivers of climate change, cars and air travel often come to mind. But transformations over the past century in the way food is produced and consumed have resulted in more greenhouse gas emissions than those from transportation. The biggest culprits? Industrial meat and dairy. The most widely cited official estimate holds that the food system is responsible for up to 30 per cent of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Some of these emissions are due to the growth of packaged and frozen foods, the increased distance foods are shipped and the rise in food waste. But the most important source of food system-related GHG emissions is the escalation of meat and dairy consumption—made possible by the expansion of industrial livestock and chemical-intensive feed crops. The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) says meat production alone now generates more GHG emissions than all the world’s transport combined.

Comic book: Together we can cool the planet!

Based on the video Together we can cool the planet! co-produced by La Vía Campesina and GRAIN in 2015, we have created a comic book to support training activities of social movements and civil society organisations around climate change. This comic book looks at how the industrial food system impacts our climate and also explains what we can do to change course and start cooling the planet. We say loud and clear: it is peasants and small farmers, along with consumers who choose agroecological products from local markets, who hold the solution to the climate crisis. We must all rise to the challenge!

Based on the video Together we can cool the planet! co-produced by La Vía Campesina and GRAIN in 2015, we have created a comic book to support training activities of social movements and civil society organisations around climate change. This comic book looks at how the industrial food system impacts our climate and also explains what we can do to change course and start cooling the planet. We say loud and clear: it is peasants and small farmers, along with consumers who choose agroecological products from local markets, who hold the solution to the climate crisis. We must all rise to the challenge!

Big business in Marrakech: fertiliser industry and finance dominate COP22

Africa will be centre-stage at this year’s Conference of Parties on climate change (COP 22) in Marrakech. According to the Moroccan steering committee, this is the “African COP”. The event will feature an “Africa Pavilion”, with activities supported by the African Development Bank (AfDB), the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA)—institutions that work to create favourable conditions for corporate investments in Africa. Thus, in Africa (and globally), the debate on climate change is captured by banks and corporations—the very institutions that, through their relentless pursuit of profit above all else, are the main drivers of global climate change.

Africa will be centre-stage at this year’s Conference of Parties on climate change (COP 22) in Marrakech. According to the Moroccan steering committee, this is the “African COP”. The event will feature an “Africa Pavilion”, with activities supported by the African Development Bank (AfDB), the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA)—institutions that work to create favourable conditions for corporate investments in Africa. Thus, in Africa (and globally), the debate on climate change is captured by banks and corporations—the very institutions that, through their relentless pursuit of profit above all else, are the main drivers of global climate change.

Food sovereignty can stop climate change and feed us all

The global food system is not only extremely inefficient and environmentally costly; it is also profoundly unjust. But governments look at the problem through a very narrow lens. Figures from the COP 21 negotiations in Paris place the impact of agriculture on climate change at 24%. Our data reveal that they are missing the bigger picture. A GRAIN opinion piece for the Korean International Strategy Centre.

The global food system is not only extremely inefficient and environmentally costly; it is also profoundly unjust. But governments look at the problem through a very narrow lens. Figures from the COP 21 negotiations in Paris place the impact of agriculture on climate change at 24%. Our data reveal that they are missing the bigger picture. A GRAIN opinion piece for the Korean International Strategy Centre.

The great climate robbery

"How the food system drives climate change and what we can do about it" A new book by GRAIN

"How the food system drives climate change and what we can do about it" A new book by GRAIN

The secretive trade agreements that could scupper climate change ​action​

While all the focus and hope for tackling climate change is on COP 21 in Paris, starting today, secretive global trade deals are already negating any commitments that might be made at the summit. The texts from the various trade agreements, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), make it clear that they will increase production, trade and consumption of fossil fuels. An article by GRAIN for the Guardian.

While all the focus and hope for tackling climate change is on COP 21 in Paris, starting today, secretive global trade deals are already negating any commitments that might be made at the summit. The texts from the various trade agreements, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), make it clear that they will increase production, trade and consumption of fossil fuels. An article by GRAIN for the Guardian.

Where the struggles of peasants and forest communities converge

GRAIN is happy to announce the release of the latest issue of the World Rainforest Movement’s monthly bulletin, which, for the first time, has been co-produced with GRAIN. The bulletin focuses on the common struggles of peasant and forest-dependent communities relating to climate change. It brings together several articles showing how corporations are advancing their agendas through false solutions, such as REDD+ or “climate smart” agriculture and forestry, and through trade agreements and certification schemes, such as the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil. The bulletin includes a range of resources and case studies highlighting how communities and social movements are working for real solutions to climate change and building food sovereignty.

GRAIN is happy to announce the release of the latest issue of the World Rainforest Movement’s monthly bulletin, which, for the first time, has been co-produced with GRAIN. The bulletin focuses on the common struggles of peasant and forest-dependent communities relating to climate change. It brings together several articles showing how corporations are advancing their agendas through false solutions, such as REDD+ or “climate smart” agriculture and forestry, and through trade agreements and certification schemes, such as the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil. The bulletin includes a range of resources and case studies highlighting how communities and social movements are working for real solutions to climate change and building food sovereignty.

How REDD+ projects undermine peasant farming and real solutions to climate change

A new publication by GRAIN and WRM looks at the dangers for peasant communities from one of the main carbon market mechanisms on the table at the upcoming UN summit on climate change in Paris.

A new publication by GRAIN and WRM looks at the dangers for peasant communities from one of the main carbon market mechanisms on the table at the upcoming UN summit on climate change in Paris.

Trade deals boosting climate change: the food factor

The climate talks in Paris in December this year are viewed as a last chance for the world's governments to commit to binding targets that might halt our march towards catastrophe. But in the countdown to Paris, many of these same governments have signed or are pushing a raft of ambitious trade and investment deals that would pre-empt measures that they could take to deal with climate change

The climate talks in Paris in December this year are viewed as a last chance for the world's governments to commit to binding targets that might halt our march towards catastrophe. But in the countdown to Paris, many of these same governments have signed or are pushing a raft of ambitious trade and investment deals that would pre-empt measures that they could take to deal with climate change

Together we can cool the planet!

A new video by La Vía Campesina and GRAIN gives you the information you need to understand how the agroindustrial food system is impacting our climate, and at the same time what we can do to change course and start cooling the planet. And every single one of us is part of the solution!

A new video by La Vía Campesina and GRAIN gives you the information you need to understand how the agroindustrial food system is impacting our climate, and at the same time what we can do to change course and start cooling the planet. And every single one of us is part of the solution!

The Exxons of agriculture

World leaders are about to converge for the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris in December, but there is only one major intergovernmental initiative that has emerged to deal with climate change and agriculture – and it is controlled by the world's largest fertiliser companies.

World leaders are about to converge for the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) in Paris in December, but there is only one major intergovernmental initiative that has emerged to deal with climate change and agriculture – and it is controlled by the world's largest fertiliser companies.